Using Padlet for Classroom Engagement

In this post, let’s take a breather from our Kirkpatrick series reflections and look at a fun free technology tool that you may choose to investigate and play with in your next instruction session that can be used to increase class engagement and provide a way for you to conduct formative assessment. I discovered this tool through LOEX Quarterly (Vol. 40: Iss. 4) in an article titled The Writing is on the Wall: Using Padlet for Whole-Class Engagement by Beth Fuchs.

Padlet is a free online multi-media “wall” that can be used collaboratively in your classroom instruction. This tool creates an online space that enables anyone with the URL to post text, images, and links to the online space anonymously. Learning Services recently test-drove Padlet during the MMW121library instruction sessions this past fall quarter to encourage participation in a collaborative class brainstorming session involving keywords. It was successful enough that I thought I would share it here with you all.

Here is how we used it. We created a Padlet wall and wrote a research question on the wall. We then asked students to go to the wall URL and as a group post to the wall keywords they may use in a search for the research question. These posts provided us with a sharable list of keywords that we could then discuss in terms of their search effectiveness.

padlet

In terms of enhancing classroom engagement, Padlet provided a way for the entire group of students to actively participate in developing search strategies and because the posts are anonymous, Padlet removes participation barriers associated with shyness or the fear of answering incorrectly. The class activity also allows instructors to check student understanding using formative assessment.

I encourage you to give Padlet a try, it just might be your new favorite tool in your instruction tool kit.

Advertisements

Level 2 assessment in the one-shot instruction session

by Dominique Turnbow

Since many librarians do one-shot instruction, I thought it might be useful to focus on Level 2 assessment techniques that you can use in this unique environment. Due to the limited amount of time I have with students in a one-shot session, I try to include activities that provide an opportunity for formative assessment, rather than focus on summative assessment.

Continue reading

Kirkpatrick Model Level 2: What have your students learned?

by Dominique Turnbow

In this series about using the Kirkpatrick Model, I’ve already talked about the value of Level 1 evaluation and provided an example of how I incorporate into my workshops. This week, I want to turn our focus to Level 2: Learning. This is the most familiar level and the one that comes to mind when we think about assessment.

Continue reading

Kirkpatrick Model Level 1: Does your instruction get two thumbs up?

by Dominique Turnbow

In this post, we’ll explore Level 1 of the Kirkpatrick Model. In the previous post, I introduced the model and pyramid I’ll be referring to throughout this series. While this model was not developed specifically for information literacy instruction, it is applicable to the work that we do as instruction librarians.

Continue reading

Meet the Kirkpatrick Model

by Dominique Turnbow

This is the first in a series of posts that will explore assessment and evaluation using the Kirkpatrick Model. Each post will offer a new challenge or insight to help you become acquainted with and use the model to inform the design of your information literacy workshops. Throughout this process, we’ll encourage you to share your ideas through the comments on the blog. The series will culminate with a Lunch N’ Learn (date TBD) where will have a guided discussion about the model and its applicability to information literacy instruction.

Continue reading

Writing Learning Outcomes for Behavior Change

by Dominique Turnbow

From an instructional design perspective, well-written learning outcomes are essential for providing effective instruction and sound assessment. If our goal with information literacy instruction is to help students change their research behavior, then our outcomes need to be written so that we know how to teach new skills and assess learning that leads to behavior change. Well-written learning outcomes can help by:

  • articulating specific knowledge, skill and/or behavior that learners need to achieve;
  • facilitating summative and formative assessment; and
  • providing a guideline for evaluation.

Continue reading